Quality Health for Young Adults

Quality Health for Young Adults

Brought to you by: Young Invincibles

Connect Learners, Trim the Fat

Details

Young adults are disconnected from the information they need to be smart, informed consumers of health care. Too many lack basic knowledge like what doctor to go to, where to get birth control, or how to avoid paying huge bills for a hospital visit. For many, this lack of information means they avoid care and skip health insurance. When they do get care, they often pay far more than they should.

The knowledge is out there but it’s disaggregated and people don’t have a means to share their experiences with their peers. Meanwhile, the healthcare technology market is booming and holds huge promise, but most of the solutions are put forth by entrenched interests, like insurance companies, who have little incentive for allow for shared customer feedback. Young adults need more information about their doctors, insurance, hospitals, and a means for peer-to-peer sharing on health care experiences to be more informed and healthier consumers. They need that information in a way that is most accessible to this generation.

We are looking for a mobile app that is easily disseminates health care information to young adults and encourages more sharing of health care reviews. Young adults are far more likely than older adults to a) use smart phones, b) find answers to health care questions online, and c) trust and value information coming from their peers. A mobile app is also important because many young adults, particularly Latinos and African Americans, only have access to the internet through their phone. For example, 53% of Latinos ages 18 to 29 are uninsured. Let 43% of young Latinos do not have access to high speed internet at home, and 38% primarily go online through their phone. A game model would also be beneficial as it could entice young users to learn more about health care and share reviews.

User Story

A Benefit to People Like Sara

Sara is 22 years old and a student at San Diego State University.  Sara has had Type I Diabetes for 12 years; every day is a challenge to keep her blood sugar in control. In November of 2008, Sara found out due to working a part-time job that she would be removed from the government run health care plan that she was on.  Just 20 years old, she did not realize how difficult finding health care would be. Without insurance, in any given month Sara would have to pay $500 for her insulin, $156 for her insulin pump supplies and $200 for 200 test strips.

When Sara found out about the cancellation of her health insurance she tried to purchase insurance from her college campus, San Diego State University. However, after speaking with the school social worker, she found out that the plan would not work for her. It would only cover a maximum of $500 a year for over-the-counter prescriptions, nowhere near enough to meet her needs. 

Looking to the private market has also not been an option. Although she works part-time while in school to help pay the rent, she does not earn nearly enough to pay the premium of a private market plan. As a result, Sara has stayed uninsured, scraping together various ways to maintain her health.

Resources & Assets

We provide health care education for young adults around the country. This past spring, we released a “Graduation Toolkit” that explains how to get health insurance when you are out of school. Young Invincibles partnered with over 60 national and state organizations, and the Toolkit reached over 300,000 young adults. Over 10 colleges and universities posted the Toolkit on their website and distributed the information to graduates. We will be releasing a “Back To School Toolkit” this Fall specifically for students. Young Invincibles is also a nationally recognized expert on young adults and health care and frequently talks in media ranging from the NY Times to CNN to give young adults and families more information on health care and how the new health care law impacts them.

What’s Still Needed

Social media, mobile social media, online games and sms outreach

teach-stem-to-the-under-represented

Teach STEM to the under-represented

Brought to you by: Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program (DAPCEP)

Connect Learners, Find Jobs

Details

We aim to increase the number of historically underrepresented students who are motivated and prepared academically to pursue degrees leading to careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) related fields through K-12 supplemental education.
We have not had the resources or time to track the progress of our alumni.  It is a challenge for us because we want to measure the impact of our programs and connect our alumni with current students for business opportunities and mentoring. The Challenge is to establish a network and create a sense of community among the alumni group. This would: define the talent pipeline of DAPCEP alumni into the workforce,  reveal opportunities and inspire current students. This app will also help with outcome tracking, allowing us to present a full picture to our funders. Ideally we will be able to clearly demonstrate that we know where our alumni are in the community, what they have gone on to do. We hope the network will reveal hot spots of alumni activity, identify potential mentors and ensure a pipeline of talent that will allow us to scale our impact.

Success =

Short term: Accumulation of data has begun and we are able to start developing a broad picture of alumni data. Exponential utilization of application with alumni and current students thinking it’s “cool”

Mid term: Alumni start reaching back to DAPCEP to participate as volunteers, mentors or donors. Communication begins to open among alumni and current students.  The application is actively used to “check in” at various networking events and DAPCEP events.

Long term: The application becomes a replicated model for various alumni groups. Over 100,000 DAPCEP users of the application.  Alumni and current students report back on opportunities presented because of their use of the application.  Outcome data is comprehensive and programs are retooled accordingly to strengthen impact

About Us:

1. Target Audience: Alumni – Focus on alumni to collect data about their careers (program outcome data); to map where they are in the country; and to connect them with current students to establish a strong DAPCEP network. Typically:
  • Between the ages of 18 and 45
  • College educated
  • Living in major urban centers, a large community stays in Detroit
  • Feel like DAPCEP changed their lives and have strong emotional connection to DAPCEP
  • Social media savvy and active users of social networks
  • Users of Smartphones

2. Target Audience: Current Students – Focus on current students to start engagement process in using the DAPCEP application so they can connect with alumni to find out about opportunities and career options. Typically:

  • 50% female
  • Most are in grades 4-9 (ages 9-14)
  • 4,000 students participate in programming annually
  • 75% are city of Detroit residents
  • Very active on social media
  • Familiar with technology utilization
  • Own or have access to a computer
  • 30-40% qualify for free or reduced lunch (social services)
  • Majority are from single parent households
  • They are active on Facebook
  • Some use Smartphones, most have at least a phone with texting plan

User Story

Amaiya

Eleven year old Amiya Alexander, a graduate of DAPCEP’s K-3 program, is making waves in Detroit and receiving national media attention for her business, Amiya’s Mobile Dance Academy. The business, which Amiya started two years ago (when she was just 9 years old) is an effort to fight childhood obesity through dance. Amiya’s ultimate goal is to attend Harvard Medical School and become an obstetrician, and running her own business will help her achieve that goal. DAPCEP introduces young children to career opportunities and stresses the importance of academic achievement and goal oriented processes. DAPCEP not only focuses on STEM subjects, but on entrepreneurship and business model development. Older students develop business plans in DAPCEP courses; however, Amiya is an exceptional example of the capacities of our K-3 students.

Resources & Assets

We help over 1500 students per day of programming, year-round Large geographic reach – students come from all over Southeast Michigan We provide a curriculum of training and mentoring to increase digital literacy We partner with 8 universities, over 40 public schools and numerous, large corporations to offer advanced programming We engage over 4,000 students annually Over 150,000 alumni

What’s Still Needed

Geo-locative and mapping, Smartphone , Web based, Integrated with existing social networks (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Foursquare), Centralized database of all participants – collect data on all users

Tablet-based client intake for HIV/AIDS service agency

Brought to you by: http://gmhc.org

Details

Challenge:

The design and implementation of a state-of-the-art tablet-based initial client intake. The current paper-based intake and program services referral algorithms will be transferred to a tablet-based application that includes decision support to allow our intake staff to better understand the fields. The tablet-based intake will also include automated skip patterns and warnings that prevent multiple responses to reduce data entry errors. A feature will be built into the application so the data can be imported into the Ryan White Part A (Electronic System for HIV/AIDS Reporting and Evaluation; eSHARE) and Part B (AIDS Institute Reporting System; AIRS) databases. This project, therefore, will expand upon our existing health information technology (HIT) infrastructure by enhancing our client-level data collection and reporting capacity.

The intake is the client’s first point of contact at Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC) during which a comprehensive assessment of his/her current situation and service needs is conducted. All of the data fields that satisfy the requirements of the Ryan White Services Report (RSR) Client Report are collected during intake (except for support services data). Client-level data will be imported from the tablet into the Ryan White Part A and B databases. The New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH) are then responsible for generating and submission.

Appropriate Technology:

Mobile App

Success =

The successful implementation of a tablet-based data entry tool connecting to our HIT.

Mission of GMHC:

GMHC fights to end the AIDS epidemic and uplift the lives of all affected.

GMHC is a leader in the fight to end AIDS and supports and empowers those affected by the epidemic and a sharply focused, high impact organization with well-integrated, multifaceted prevention strategies for people who are HIV positive and at risk.

Research and evaluation inform all aspects of our work including direct services, public policy, advocacy, community support and social marketing, while promoting activities that decrease  structural barriers and advances the possibility of a stigma- free society and a world without AIDS.

User Story

Paul

From one of our staff: “I was at a breakout session and an elderly couple representing PFLAG was there. They were Tom and Grace Rogers, and we began talking. They asked me where I was from, and I told them GMHC in New York. “Oh yes, we know GMHC,” Grace said in her thick Dallas drawl. As we talked they told their son’s story. Paul was a client of GMHC in the late 80s or early 90s, from what I gather, and they told me that the agency meant the a lot to him. He came to GMHC for meals and support when little else was out there. Grace said that Paul was just a couple years short of the treatment breakthroughs that changed the face of AIDS in the 90s, and he passed away like so many in his generation. Throughout the conference, Grace and Tom were happy and assertive advocates for LGBT youth. They care deeply about the future of our young people and they’re carrying their son’s spirit with them every day. I told them I was just happy that GMHC was there to offer support when Paul needed it.”

Resources & Assets

We have database technology/programming capability (Senior Programmer) and IS Project Management skills. Also, intake processing expertise, along with data analysis professionals.

What’s Still Needed

Tablet application.

trim-the-fat

Challenge Briefs

  • Communications with Diverse Clients

    read more

    To build a nurturing environment that provides the basic material resources needed for the social, emotional, economic and spiritual growth and prosperity of the DC community. The challenge focuses specifically on our client engagement programming. … more

  • Quality Health for Young Adults

    read more

    Young Invincibles began in the summer of 2009 when we recognized that young people’s voices were not being heard in the debate over health care reform. In a little more than a year, ‘YI’ went from a group run out of a law school cafeteria to a national organization, representing the interests of 18 to 34 year-olds wherever decisions about our collective health futures are being made. … more

find-jobs

Challenge Briefs

  • Bidding and fundraising app for people living with HIV

    read more

    Housing Works is a healing community of people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS. Our mission is to end the dual crises of homelessness and AIDS through relentless advocacy, the provision of lifesaving services, and entrepreneurial businesses that sustain our efforts.  We provide medical care, housing and job training to our clients. Most funding for … more

  • Teach STEM to the under-represented

    read more

    We aim to increase the number of historically underrepresented students who are motivated and prepared academically to pursue degrees leading to careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). … more

  • Communications with Diverse Clients

    read more

    To build a nurturing environment that provides the basic material resources needed for the social, emotional, economic and spiritual growth and prosperity of the DC community. The challenge focuses specifically on our client engagement programming. … more

  • Goodwill Alumni Challenge

    read more

    At Goodwill we believe that everyone has the right to support themselves and their families through the power of work. Goodwill does not have a mechanism for former clients and current staff, clients and partners to keep in touch with one another. … more

  • Social Impact Shopper

    read more

    MEDA and our partner organizations at Plaza Adelante in the Mission of San Francisco are located within a larger part of town that is host to a mix of low, middle and high income people. Over the last 40 years … more

connect-learners

Challenge Briefs

  • Civic engagement through media

    read more

    We believe Asian Americans can be a vibrant part of American civic discourse locally and nationally and that we will do so through engagement with cross-platform media. The Asian American community is the most complicated ethnic communities in the U.S. … more

  • Teach STEM to the under-represented

    read more

    We aim to increase the number of historically underrepresented students who are motivated and prepared academically to pursue degrees leading to careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). … more

  • Communications with Diverse Clients

    read more

    To build a nurturing environment that provides the basic material resources needed for the social, emotional, economic and spiritual growth and prosperity of the DC community. The challenge focuses specifically on our client engagement programming. … more

  • Quality Health for Young Adults

    read more

    Young Invincibles began in the summer of 2009 when we recognized that young people’s voices were not being heard in the debate over health care reform. In a little more than a year, ‘YI’ went from a group run out of a law school cafeteria to a national organization, representing the interests of 18 to 34 year-olds wherever decisions about our collective health futures are being made. … more

  • Goodwill Alumni Challenge

    read more

    At Goodwill we believe that everyone has the right to support themselves and their families through the power of work. Goodwill does not have a mechanism for former clients and current staff, clients and partners to keep in touch with one another. … more

bank-the-unbanked

Challenge Briefs

  • Communications with Diverse Clients

    read more

    To build a nurturing environment that provides the basic material resources needed for the social, emotional, economic and spiritual growth and prosperity of the DC community. The challenge focuses specifically on our client engagement programming. … more

  • Social Impact Shopper

    read more

    MEDA and our partner organizations at Plaza Adelante in the Mission of San Francisco are located within a larger part of town that is host to a mix of low, middle and high income people. Over the last 40 years … more

Social Impact Shopper

Social Impact Shopper

Brought to you by: MEDA

Bank the Unbanked, Find Jobs

Details

At MEDA we believe that Latinos are some of the most marginalized populations in the country and that by leveraging technology assets along with our training assets we can effect continued economic development in our community.
Local business we helped into being

Challenge: MEDA and our partner organizations at Plaza Adelante in the Mission of San Francisco are located within a larger part of town that is host to a mix of low, middle and high income people.  Over the last 40 years many parts of our neighborhood have become popular destinations for both locals and tourists to get the “real flavor” for San Francisco.  We have been a part of this development, assisting new businesses, driving family economic independence and affecting city policy.  Our challenge is to the community at large.  We want to find a way to use social sharing and mobile devices among both our constituents and the rest of the city to drive customers to the local businesses that we support.

There is a growing movement in our area to shop locally and invest in social enterprises.  We need to find a way to connect the hundreds of businesses we’ve helped over the years with this burgeoning group of savvy purchasers.  We see that these people are early adopters of technology and that they will usually follow the trends among their friend groups.  MEDA has done much to access and leverage social networking online, but have not been able to find a simple effective way to meet these people in their pocket.

We believe that similar circumstances are occurring in other neighborhoods like ours across the country and would hope to develop a solution that could be adopted by others in the future.

Target audience: Middle class, technology savvy residents of the Mission who do business locally, want to do the right thing and may have investment or entertainment income that could benefit the MEDA community.

Appropriate technology platforms: SMS, Check in, Social Networking, Web, Apps,

Success = Engage tech savvy people from neighborhood and nearby communities to become socially conscious consumers at business and services supported by MEDA.  True success is when these people understand the role of MEDA in the community, are interested in supporting it and become involved not only as consumers, but as supporters, investors and volunteers.

About Us:

Core mission: To achieve economic justice for San Francisco’s low- to moderate-income Latino families through asset development.  Asset Development is the process of encouraging and supporting individuals and families to develop, accumulate and manage personal, social and material (especially financial) assets.

How we do it: For over 38 years MEDA has worked to improve economic and social conditions in the neighborhood by stimulating investment, enhancing the business environment, and creating jobs for area residents. MEDA is committed to maintaining the cultural identity and resources of the Mission District.  All of work is provided in both English and Spanish.

  • Our business development program assists entrepreneurs in San Francisco to start and expand their businesses through individual consultations and group workshops.
  • MEDA’s Homeownership program provides one-on-one counseling and group workshops on homeownership related services including, financial education, credit counseling, down payment and closing costs assistance programs, affordable housing options, and foreclosure intervention counseling.
  • MEDA’s Financial Education & Coaching Program provides low- and moderate-income Latino families with workshops and coaching to achieve  financial literacy with three key outcomes: Improving credit scores to 650 or higher; increasing savings to three months of living expenses or greater; and reducing debt to income ratio to 40% or lower.

Location: Mission District of San Francisco

User Story

Elena Ramirez

Elena Ramirez first came to MEDA to establish a bookkeeping system for her family child care business. This assistance helped her to organize her business and steer it towards growth. Elena soon returned to MEDA to expand her business license from 8 to 14 children.  The assistance included loan/grant packaging, writing a business plan, and calculating a project budget.  According to Elena, if not for MEDA’s help, she would not have secured $30,000 through grants and loans to make the changes to her home needed for her new license.  Expanding her child care business also enabled Elena to employ 2 additional assistants to help her with her 14 enrolled children.

Resources & Assets

We serve over 4000 people each year through our education initiatives, who would be a great test group for any new products we develop. We are in the process of creating an internal/external service integration web tool that will allow us to leverage years worth contacts for a referral or check-in system. Lastly we have some contacts with developers working on similar products that may be interested in user testing and market testing with us.

What’s Still Needed

We need to align developers to commit to the challenge and funding to implement the app.

Goodwill Alumni Challenge

Details

At Goodwill we believe that everyone has the right to support themselves and their families through the power of work.

Goodwill does not have a mechanism for former clients and current staff, clients and partners to keep in touch with one another. We believe such a service would help our staff and constituents to share vital information over time that would help those in need. In addition we think this social sharing could be fun, engaging and have unexpected outcomes for our constituents. Due to the transient nature of our population, the Goodwill network often has no way of keeping track of or reaching out to, former clients. While their addresses and phone number change frequently, former Goodwill clients often have access to internet enabled devices. By offering a space for former clients to connect with the Goodwill network and each other, Goodwill hopes to track the progress of these individuals to understand the long term results of our programs and services. We are seeking both in-person and technology solutions to this challenge. Though our clients are diverse and range widely in their access to technology, we believe the right applications or ecosystem could help them receive greater benefit from our community. Please read the story of one of our clients to get an idea of the kinds of people who would benefit from this app. More Client Stories are available at the link below.

Target Audience: Beneficiaries of Goodwill programs and services as well as Goodwill partner organizations.

Core mission: Offer people singular opportunities to take control of their own lives. We are dedicated to helping motivated individuals overcome barriers to employment, such as long-term welfare dependence, a physical or mental disability, homelessness, incarceration, substance abuse or limited English skills.

How we do it: We offer numerous career development programs and services, as well as jobs with benefits within our agency and retail stores. We are committed to helping businesses fill entry to mid-level positions with people trained in our programs. We also work with employers to develop customized training programs for potential and current employees.

User Story

Darren Primes

It has been said that a person has to hit rock bottom before they can start finding their way up again, and Darren Primes knows just what that means. He had a good job and a solid work history for companies including Lockheed and Ford and took care of his wife and family — that was until he started using crack cocaine and his life began a steep spiral downward. He became addicted to drugs, lost the support of his wife and children, and spent the next 20 years in and out of the prison system, first in the state penitentiary, then in Federal prison. It was after his second stint in prison that Darren finally did reach rock bottom, and he was ready to change his life. His only regret is that he didn’t find it sooner. “From where I was raised, my rock bottom should have been a long time ago,” he said. “Before you know it, you’re 50 years old, and I blew it by using drugs. It’s not like I have a lifetime now. These bones are getting old. It was such a waste of time that I put myself through.” “Then I found Krystal,” he said, and everything changed for him. He met Krystal Koop and entered the Ex-Offender Navigator program to start to repair his life. “She asked me, ‘what do you want?’ I started telling her what I wanted and soon I was running all over the place trying to do what she asked of me – paperwork, One Stop classes, trying to fulfill all the requirements for me to be successful in the program.” Krystal was impressed by Darren the moment she met him. “Of course, he’s a very personable, nice guy, who loves his wife and kids,” she said. “He had a fall from grace, and he really owned it. That’s the biggest key to his success, realizing that it was no one else’s fault. He’s responsible for his success or failure.” Now Darren works for Green Streets Cleaners, driving a delivery van, has reunited with his family, and even mentors young adults in his community or “wherever it’s needed” about the dangers of living “the drug life.” “Goodwill has done a lot for me, and I am so happy again,” he said. “To this day, I tell people about Goodwill programs. I tell everybody because Goodwill is doing good things. If you do what Goodwill asks of you, they are willing to teach you.” “The way I feel today, I have had a spiritual awakening. I pray for another day to do what I’m supposed to do. I don’t want to mess up.” Read more participant stories here: http://sfgoodwill.org/DebrasStory.aspx

Resources & Assets

We educate hundreds of people every year through our various training programs. We have a network of tech savvy instructors. We refurbish both computers and mobile phones. We have a network of social service partners with whom we offer an array of services. We are currently working on centralizing our partner database.

What’s Still Needed

A technology solution that is inexpensive and scalable.

Communications with Diverse Clients Brought to you by: Bread for the City

Details

To build a nurturing environment that provides the basic material resources needed for the social, emotional, economic and spiritual growth and prosperity of the DC community.

The challenge focuses specifically on our client engagement programming. We need to reach specific clients more quickly, efficiently, reliably, and affordably. Currently, we get the word out about our various workshops through flyers and phone calls. But phone calls are very time-consuming, and not always effective.An SMS application would help us send word about our workshops to large numbers of clients (100-200) immediately, saving hours of calls. We also find that some clients prefer to be contacted in this way.We would also like to enable clients to communicate in response to our messages, ideally in a way that corresponded with their personal record. (We’ve looked at some platforms where you wouldn’t be able to receive replies at all, or wouldn’t be able to associate a number with a name.)

We’re experimenting with some platforms like GOBA, but nothing seems to meet our direct needs. We’d like something that can be opt-in by people texting a given word to a given number; we’d also like the ability to add names/numbers directly into the system ourselves. Ideally the solution could integrate these text communications with a client’s personal record (we are about to migrate our databases to Salesforce; ~3-6 months). We would also like to be able to organize clients by interests and needs so that event information and program updates is only broadcast to clients to whom that information is relevant.

Literacy varies among our clientele; messages would have to be very simple and easy to understand. Also, we need flexibility and controls to ensure that we’re not sending as many costly texts to people who pay for each message.

Target Audience:

  • Our target audience includes low-income mothers, fathers, people with disabilities, and the homeless with limited access to technology. They may be unemployed or underemployed with limited access to news and media.

Appropriate technology platforms:

  • SMS is the most widely used technology among our clients. They also have limited access to the internet through public libraries.

About Bread for the City

Core mission: The mission of Bread for the City is to provide vulnerable residents of Washington, DC, with comprehensive services, including food, clothing, medical care, and legal and social services, in an atmosphere of dignity and respect. We recognize that all people share a common humanity, and that all are responsible to themselves and to society as a whole.

How we do it: Bread for the City offers five program services to low-income residents of Washington, DC: food and clothing distribution, primary medical care, legal advice and representation, and comprehensive social services. All services are free of cost to eligible DC residents, and are provided under one roof in an atmosphere of dignity and respect.
Thanks to the efforts of hundreds of volunteers and the contributions of thousands in the community, Bread for the City helps more than 10,000 people each month.

  • Food Program: Last year staff and volunteers provided groceries to thousands of hungry people, an average of 4,985 households each month.
  • Clothing Program: Clothing donations from individuals, schools, offices and places of worship keep our clothing room stocked with seasonally appropriate clothes for children and adults.
  • Medical Clinic: Bread for the City has been providing primary medical care to uninsured and low-income children and adults since 1974.
  • Social Services: Any District resident, regardless of income, may speak with a case manager during our walk-in hours
  • Representative Payee Program
  • Legal Clinic: Bread for the City operates two legal clinics, one out of each of our centers in Northwest and Southeast Washington
  • We also conduct skill-building programs, including computer classes, nutrition and gardening workshops, and job readiness training.

User Story

Leonard Edwards

I was raised to be self sufficient. Pull yourself up by your boot laces, dust yourself off, and stand up on your own two feet. When you get into a tight situation, think; there is always a solution. But in that hazy, humid summer evening of ‘06, I was at a real low point in my life. I found myself in a situation that was totally alien to me. I needed legal advice and I needed it fast. I’d been fired abruptly — and to make matters worse, when I went to apply for unemployment compensation, my boss tried to claim that I’d quit. So I was facing unemployment without compensation. Now, I am not a young man any more, so it’s not like there was another job around the corner. I found myself asking these new questions: how am I gonna pay rent? How am I gonna eat? I needed help. A friend told me to try Bread for the City. I was skeptical at first. I was scared and confused, even desperate, and wary that someone might try to take advantage of my emotional state. And I did not know whether a place called Bread for the City could help me with this predicament. Well as it turned out, the staff was professional, courteous, and sincere. I was not looked down on or judged. I knew immediately that this place was not out to get my money; that I was safe here. (In fact I thought that I had died and gone to heaven!) They referred me to the Employment Justice Center in their facility, where I got advice on how to request a hearing — and

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how to fight for my rights in court. Though I got my unemployment assistance, I now didn’t have health insurance. So I came back to Bread for the City — this time to be a patient of the medical clinic. And I have to be honest, I was doubtful again. I had this stereotype of what to expect in a community health clinic, to be rushed through without any real care given to you as a person. But I found their medical staff here to be way better than the primary care physician that I had before! Bread for the City’s staff all go above and beyond the call of duty. As a former Marine, you know that I mean a lot to say that about a group of civilians. Indeed, because of this experience with Bread for the City, I am proud to have stayed in the family of this special organization. Today, I’m not just a client, but a donor, a volunteer, and more. So far, I’ve helped build and tend the new rooftop garden. I had some previous experience with gardening – my grandfather had a farm, and my parents had a garden in their backyard. But today I don’t have access to green space, so this was a great opportunity. And I now I’m starting my own garden at home, using the techniques we’re learning about potting and tending the

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plants. For instance, this last weekend we learned about all kinds of pest controls. This garden is new and in great shape, but it has bugs just like any other. We made insect repellent with garlic, basil, peppers — that’s all it took! Here we are conditioned to think that we have to go buy chemicals from the store and blast them all over the place, and it turns out we can do it easy, cheap, and chemical-free. We also took aluminum pie pans, painted them with faces, and hung them above our berry bushes to ward off birds. I had no idea there was so much to learn and do — but now I’m coming to feel like I’m an expert in these things. Next year, I want to go beyond potted plants and build a garden right in my home. I look forward to keep giving back to Bread’s community right here – especially with educating children about how vegetables are grown, and what different foods look like in their natural states (not just the rotting ones on store shelves). I don’t know where I might be if I had not found Bread for the City. I might be a statistic in a jail cell, like so many others who don’t get the right advice at the crucial time. I can truly say that I love being a client and a volunteer with Bread, and am grateful to have the opportunity to join them in serving our community with dignity and respect. http://www.breadforthecity.org/category/client-stories/

Resources & Assets

We see 300-500 people each day for various services. We provide a curriculum of training and mentoring to increase digital literacy, with a mix of staff and volunteers to interface with clients. We have a network of social service partners with whom we offer an array of services. We are currently working on centralizing our constituent database via Salesforce We operate computer labs at each center, and are planning to develop more.

What’s Still Needed

Short term — A solution that enables us to expediently broadcast text messages to hundreds of clients, alerting them to our workshops. Mid term — attendance at Bread for the City workshops rises, even as time spent doing outreach decreases. Long term — SMS texting becomes an integrated component of our Client Relationship Management system, even being used in case management and primary care.